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Dublin More Pricey Than London, Rome and Paris To Eat Out

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Going out for a meal in Dublin is more expensive than in London, Rome and Paris.

A new survey which looked at the cost of eating out across Europe showed Irish diners need deep pockets before ordering.

It was estimated a three-course meal for two in the capital costs €80, or €20 more than it would cost to eat in a Parisian restaurant.

Going out for a meal in Dublin is more expensive than in London, Rome and Paris. Pic: Shutterstock

There was some relief for the Irish hospitality industry after the Government confirmed they would be retaining the special 9% VAT rate until the end of August.

The survey, by casino promoter Bonusetu, looked at average mid-market restaurants and relies on online cost-of-living aggregators for its figures.

London is only slightly cheaper for eating out, with three course meal costing €78.05, while the bill will come to €70 in Rome.

Pic: Shutterstock
A new survey which looked at the cost of eating out across Europe showed Irish diners need deep pockets before thinking of ordering. Pic: Shutterstock

Luxembourg ranks alongside Dublin at €80 but you will need to break the bank in Copenhagen where a bite to eat will cost €107.32, which is even more than Monaco on €100.

Restaurants Association of Ireland chief executive Adrian Cummins told The Irish Times massive increases in costs for businesses was to blame for the costs.

‘The cost of business has increased,’ he told the paper. ‘I don’t really need to go through them all: energy costs, rent, rates have all gone up.’

Pic: Shutterstock
It was estimated a three-course meal for two in the capital costs €80, or €20 more than it would cost to eat in a Parisian restaurant. Pic: Shutterstock

He said the industry had worked hard to keep costs below the rate of inflation at 8% while restaurant prices are on average up by 7%.

Mr Cummins noted that French energy and labour costs were lower than in the Republic and he warned restaurants were facing the bleak prospect of huge energy price rises of 200-300 per cent.

‘That’s just not sustainable,’ he told the paper.

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