Monday, June 17, 2024

What does it take to win at Pinehurst No.2? – News – Irish Golf Desk

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It’s worth saying that these guides to the world’s best courses are subjective and often bring out strong emotions in golfers who don’t agree. The reality is that we don’t all see things the same way, and any guide is ultimately based on someone else’s opinion. While that is true, it also doesn’t mean they are without careful consideration. 

Whether it’s Lonely Planet’s guide to the best holiday destination, the Michelin Guide to the best restaurants, or even the guide casinoalpha.ie has painstakingly produced to find the best online casinos in Ireland, the truth is that a great deal of thought and comparison goes into the end results. 

In this case, while there might be concerns about Pinehurst No. 2’s devilish inverted saucer-type greens which divide opinion but have wooed the authors, what isn’t in doubt is that this course stirs the heart.

Yes, Pinehurst holds an eternal place in the history of the US Open and is a call to arms to seize opportunities when they present themselves. 

Where legends once walked 

Payne Stewart’s moving bronze statue immortalizing his putt to win the 1999 US Open at Pinehurst No. 2 is perhaps the best reminder of this and how quickly life can also change.

Tragically, Stewart passed away in a plane accident aged 42 just four months after lifting the US Open trophy in June 1999 following a loss of cabin pressure. 

Instead of mourning, however, Stewart’s heroics on that early summer day in June 1999 are celebrated at Pinehurst.

Looking back, it was Stewart’s display of nerveless putting during his final round when the American made three clutch putts on 16, 17, and 18 to stay one stroke ahead of Phil Mickelson that helped him tame some of the most unforgiving greens in the world. 

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